Wolf Symbol

Published on May 5, 2013 by Casey

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Wolf Symbol
Wolf Symbol

Meaning of the Wolf Symbol

Native American Indians were a deeply spiritual people and they communicated their history, thoughts, ideas and dreams from generation to generation through Symbols and Signs such as the Wolf symbol. Native American symbols are geometric portrayals of celestial bodies, natural phenomena and animal designs. The tracks of an animal, such as a wolf, were used to indicate a direction.

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The meaning of the Wolf symbol is to symbolize direction and leadership and the wolf symbol also embodied both protection and destruction. The Wolf symbol signified strength, endurance, Instinct linked with intelligence, family values and believed to give guidance in dreams and meditation. Many American Indians considered themselves descended from wolves, and thus worshiped the wolf as both a god and an ancestor. According to the Pawnee creation myth, the wolf was the first creature to experience death. Some tribes believed that the timber wolves, howling at the moon, were spiritual beings that could speak to the gods and impart magical powers.

Meaning of the Wolf Symbol – Good and Evil

The Wolf has always been a symbol of evil as well as good. Wolves were revered in some Native American tribes but they are also feared in other cultures. Wolves were generally revered by tribes that survived by hunting, but were thought little of by those that survived through agriculture. Native Americans incorporated wolves into their myths, legends, ceremonies and rituals, portraying them as ferocious warriors in some traditions and thieving spirits in others. The Native American Indians therefore associated the wolf with creativity, fertility and protection and destruction.

Source: warpaths2peacepipes

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
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@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2014,
    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
    month = Oct,
    day = 24,
    year = 2014,
    url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/wolf-symbol/},
}
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Did You Know?

The smallest, by population, Federally Recognized Tribe in the United States is the “Augustine Band of Cahuilla Indians, California (formerly the Augustine Band of Cahuilla Mission Indians of the Augustine Reservation)”. There were only 8 enrolled members as of 2002.

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