Shawanaga Indian Tribe of Ontario

Published on September 27, 2010 by John

Love this article and want to save it to read again later? Add it to your favourites! To find all your favourite posts, check out My Favourites on the menu bar.

Shawanaga - Ontario

dna testing, dna ancestry testing, ancestry, genealogy, indian genealogy records, paternity testing, turquoise jewelry, native american jewelry

Shawanaga – Ontario

On-Reserve Population: 89 ( INAC, 1991)
Land Base: Shawanaga 17 – 3377ha, Naiscoutaing 17A – 1006ha, Naiscoutaing 17B – 72ha
Languages
Linguistic Affiliation: Algonkian (Ojibway)

Mother Tongue:
English 82%
Aboriginal 6%
English & Aboriginal 12%
French & Other 0%
Affiliations
Independent

Electoral Ridings
(F) Parry Sound – Muskoka
(P) Parry Sound

Historical Notes
Prior to European contact (circa 1650-1760), the Southeastern Ojibway lived a nomadic existence, depending on trading, fishing, hunting, trapping and gathering for their livelihood. The Shawanaga Ojibway are descendants of the Southeastern Ojibway, and live within the boundaries of the territory described by the Robinson-Huron Treaty of 1850.

Industries
Two thirds of the work force is involved in the service sector, divided equally between government and non-government services. The rest is concentrated in the construction and trade industries. Local industries include a tourist lodge and marina.

Educational Facilities
Elementary
students bused to Nobel

Secondary
students bused to Parry Sound

Community Services and Facilities
fire station, fire truck
community hall, museum
homemakers program, home support program
baseball diamond, playground area
NNADAP worker

Community Health Representative, education counsellor
Child Welfare Committee, Education Committee

Library
Ontario First Nations Policing Arrangements – one constable

Communications
telephone – Bell Canada
radio – CKLP, service from Parry Sound
newspapers – daily from Parry Sound
television – CKVR, CKCO, MCTV, service from Sudbury

Utilities
water – centralized water main system; also private wells
sewage – private septic tanks
energy/electricity – Ontario Hydro

Source: www.chiefs-of-ontario.org

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
Based on the collective work of NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, © 2014 Native American Encyclopedia.
Cite This Source | Link To Shawanaga Indian Tribe of Ontario
Add these citations to your bibliography. Select the text below and then copy and paste it into your document.

American Psychological Association (APA):

Shawanaga Indian Tribe of Ontario NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved September 02, 2014, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/shawanaga-indian-tribe-of-ontario/

Chicago Manual Style (CMS):

Shawanaga Indian Tribe of Ontario NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com. NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/shawanaga-indian-tribe-of-ontario/ (accessed: September 02, 2014).

Modern Language Association (MLA):

"Shawanaga Indian Tribe of Ontario" NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia 02 Sep. 2014. <NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/shawanaga-indian-tribe-of-ontario/>.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE):

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "Shawanaga Indian Tribe of Ontario" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/shawanaga-indian-tribe-of-ontario/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: September 02, 2014.

BibTeX Bibliography Style (BibTeX)

@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2014,
    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
    month = Sep,
    day = 02,
    year = 2014,
    url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/shawanaga-indian-tribe-of-ontario/},
}
You might also like:

Tags:  , , , , , , , , , , , ,

Facebook Comments

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Did You Know?

Clarence Birdseye is attributed with bringing quick frozen foods to the masses. He got the idea during his fur trapping expeditions to Labrador in 1912 and 1916, where he saw the Native Americans and Aboriginals use freezing to preserve foods.

Sponsor
In the Spotlight
Latest Articles
Most Favourited Posts
Photo Galleries
Native American Tribe KlamathNative American Tribe ClayoquotNative American Tribe Tewa IINative American Tribe Hesquiat