Salvia lyrata ‘Purple Knockout’ – ‘Purple Knockout’ Lyre-leaved Sage

Published on June 9, 2012 by Casey

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Salvia lyrata 'Purple Knockout'
Salvia lyrata ‘Purple Knockout’

Showy flowers grow 12’24″ tall and bloom with lavender blue, nectar-rich flowers in spring. The American Goldfinch and other songbirds go for the seed in summer and early fall. ‘Purple Knockout’ has shiny deep burgundy leaves tinged with violet.

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Benefits

  • Provides nectar for butterflies and other pollinators in spring
  • Songbirds feed on seed
  • Shiny deep burgundy leaves
  • Good ground cover for moist soil
  • Very easy to grow

Homeowner Growing and Maintenance Tips

  • Grows readily in average, medium wet to wet soils in full sun.
  • Tolerates very light shade, but best in full sun.
  • Tolerates heat and humidity.
  • Self-seeds and naturalizes in optimum growing conditions.
  • Leave seed heads for bird use.

Native Range

Connecticut and southeastern New York to southern Illinois and Missouri south to Texas and Florida.

Native Trivia

Ponds are critical to the survival of frogs and other amphibians. Unfortunately, development has reduced the number of ponds and pools available for amphibians, so a backyard pond can go a long way to providing this needed habitat

Characteristics & Attributes

    Plan Sub Group
    • Low Perennials

    Exposure
    • Sun

    Soil Moisture Preference
    • Moist

    Attracts Wildlife
    • Songbirds
    • Amphibians
    • Butterflies

    Bloom Time
    • Early Spring
    • Late Spring / Early Summer

    Habitat Collection
    • Wet Sun
    • Butterfly

    Foliage Color
    • Burgandy

    Uses
    • Ground cover

Source: abnativeplants

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
Based on the collective work of NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, © 2014 Native American Encyclopedia.
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American Psychological Association (APA):

Salvia lyrata ‘Purple Knockout’ – ‘Purple Knockout’ Lyre-leaved Sage NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved August 28, 2014, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/salvia-lyrata-purple-knockout-purple-knockout-lyre-leaved-sage/

Chicago Manual Style (CMS):

Salvia lyrata ‘Purple Knockout’ – ‘Purple Knockout’ Lyre-leaved Sage NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com. NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/salvia-lyrata-purple-knockout-purple-knockout-lyre-leaved-sage/ (accessed: August 28, 2014).

Modern Language Association (MLA):

"Salvia lyrata ‘Purple Knockout’ – ‘Purple Knockout’ Lyre-leaved Sage" NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia 28 Aug. 2014. <NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/salvia-lyrata-purple-knockout-purple-knockout-lyre-leaved-sage/>.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE):

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "Salvia lyrata ‘Purple Knockout’ – ‘Purple Knockout’ Lyre-leaved Sage" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/salvia-lyrata-purple-knockout-purple-knockout-lyre-leaved-sage/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: August 28, 2014.

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    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
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    day = 28,
    year = 2014,
    url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/salvia-lyrata-purple-knockout-purple-knockout-lyre-leaved-sage/},
}
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Did You Know?

Clarence Birdseye is attributed with bringing quick frozen foods to the masses. He got the idea during his fur trapping expeditions to Labrador in 1912 and 1916, where he saw the Native Americans and Aboriginals use freezing to preserve foods.

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