Parris K. Butler – Mojave and Cherokee

Published on June 19, 2014 by Carol

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Parris K. Butler painting

Parris K. Butler ,(Mojave/Cherokee), was born in 1955 in Washington , D.C. where his parents encouraged his appreciation and exploration of Art from an early age. In 1984 and 85 he received AFA degrees in 2- Dimensional Arts and Creative Writing from the Institute of American Indian Arts in Santa Fe , N.M.

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Since that time he has lived and worked in Denver/Aspen , Colorado – Santa Fe , New Mexico – Needles/Berkeley/Oakland , California – Phoenix , Arizona . He has exhibited his work sporadically across the SouthWest with little intent to do so. He works primarily in Acrylic on canvas , Acrylic on paper , Pen & Ink and , various Printmaking media , he is currently compiling a manuscript of his poetry and other writings.

“I believe that true Works of Art are ultimately the result of acute perception by the Artist and that technical skills such as the application of a given medium are a secondary concern. While so much of our understanding of the world is gleaned from information which comes to us prepared , presorted , and predefined by the institutions of society and the economy driven media , opportunities to observe the world and the intricate events of transformation and interaction of which we are comprised become more difficult to focus on. Through the act of perception the Artist acquires some degree of understanding of the person or place or event observed and having received this essence of its meaning becomes a part of the transformation which results in the Work of Art. Technical skills from the drawing of the proverbial straight line to the application of color theory or spatial composition develop as the Artist is driven to communicate to the audience some aspect of the subject in its essential form.”

Source: nativeart

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@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2014,
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}
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Chewing Gum is a Native Invention. Spruce resin was used to quench thirst, and also as a medicine. South and Central American Indians collected chicle from the Sapodilla tree to make gum.

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