Oklevueha Native American Church

Published on August 30, 2013 by Amy

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Seminole Medicine Man
Seminole Medicine Man

Oklevueha Native American Church (ONAC) is a United States federally recognized indigenous American Native Earth Based Healing and Empowerment Church. ONAC is a unification of Lakota Sioux and Oklevueha Seminole Spiritual Traditions. Lakota Sioux Chief Richard ‘He Who Holds the Foundation’ Swallow and Oklevueha Seminole Medicine Man, James Warren ‘Flaming Eagle’ Mooney welcome you with open arms regardless of your race, gender, age, social position, religious back ground and/or financial status. All are welcome into our sacred healing and empowering indigenous spiritual community.

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Oklevueha Native American Church supports making Indigenous Ceremonies and Oklevueha Native American Church Sacraments available to all people. This purpose is sustained historically by many indigenous American Native peoples and other indigenous cultures around the world. ONAC believes that participation in these sacred ceremonies will enhance ones ability to embrace the following human attributes:

FAITH: Trust, belief, confidence and hopefulness
RESPECT: Esteem, deference, politeness and civility,
HONOR: Integrity, honesty, goodness and decency,
CHARITY: Goodwill, compassion, kindheartedness and public-spiritedness,
FORGIVENESS: Pardon, exonerate and feel no resentment toward,
HUMILITY: Modesty, humbleness, meekness and diffidence,
GRATITUDE: Gratefulness, thankfulness, and appreciation.

One mission of Oklevueha Native American Church is to maintain the integrity of bona fide American Native indigenous ceremonies, thus assisting the indigenous peoples to retain their culture and those of other races to receive the benefits of those cultures and understandings.

The Lakota Sioux Nation and Oklevueha Seminole spiritual traditions merged their two indigenous earth based healing and empowering traditions, December 17, 2007. The original agreement named this merging of American Native spiritual traditions, Oklevueha Lakota Sioux Nation Native American Church, now known as Oklevueha Native American Church (ONAC).

The merging of these two spiritual traditions honors the courageous heritage of the Oglala and Lakota Sioux Nations, and the Oklevueha Seminole Colony of American Native traditions. It created a synergy, bringing together the best of both cultures.

The Oglala and Lakota Sioux spiritual leaders Crazy Horse, Sitting Bull, and Fool Bull (Native Americans) maintained their spiritual traditions with a tenacious commitment to their American Native culture through honoring and respecting Mother Earth and Father Sky. Both Crazy Horse and Sitting Bull were murdered primarily as a result of their unwavering commitment to honor their American Native way of life. Fool Bull wisely and tenaciously weaved his traditional medicine spiritual ways and laid foundations that allowed the legal protection of American Native spirituality. This he did in spite of the corrupt politics of the reservation world and the Bureau of Indian Affairs. This weaving enabled his descendents of Sioux spiritual traditions such as Leslie Fool Bull and Richard ‘He Who Has the Foundation’ Swallow to survive in the reservation world and defend and sustain their culture.

Osceola, Quanah Parker, and James Mooney maintained the Oklevueha Seminole spiritual traditions, in secret, on and off of Federally Recognized Indian Reservations. The reason for the secrecy was that, if the people that carried these traditions were revealed, they would have been murdered. In the 1800’s, there were bounties placed on all Seminoles that did not reside on federally recognized Indian reservations. If a government agent of the United States were to kill, and turn in a severed Seminole head, they would receive as much as $200.00. In the 1800’s, this was a massive amount of money.

The Seminole spiritual traditions are embedded in a multitude of indigenous cultures. The Seminole indigenous spiritual tradition traces its beliefs to Central America, primarily in the vicinity of Guatemala. Because of the infusion of escaped slaves mostly from plantations of Georgia, the indigenous spirituality of African indigenous people is included in Seminole spirituality. With the melding of Irish and Scottish misfits into the Seminole culture came indigenous Gaelic traditions. The Seminole melting pot of earth based healing and empowering spiritual traditions is indeed rich and varied.

One reason for the survival of these indigenous spiritual traditions is based on the ability of the followers to listen to, and follow the promptings of the heart in the ‘moment’. They could not have survived the onslaught of atrocities with one set of practices for each one of their indigenous ceremonies. It is also reasonable to conclude that women (Matriarch) are the true caretakers of the indigenous medicines and the men (Patriarch) are the protector of the medicines.

The seemingly divergent traditions of the staunch Lakota Sioux ceremonial ways, and the fluid, spiritual traditions of the Seminoles makes the merging of these two indigenous earth based ways flexible and applicable to today’s spiritual healing practitioners. A study of the Oklevueha Native American Church Oklevueha Native American Church – Code of Ethics makes the merging of these two spiritual traditions inviting to seekers of the truth who desire to know the essence of who they are, and where their original traditions blossomed.

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