Native American Rocks Legends: The Buffalo Rock – version 1

Published on January 23, 2013 by Casey

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The Buffalo Rock
The Buffalo Rock

Native American Rocks Legends: The Buffalo Rock

A Blackfoot Legend

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The buffalo rock, as called by the Blackfoot Indians, was usually a fossil shell of some kind, picked up on the prairie. Whoever found one was considered fortunate, for it was thought to give a person great power over buffalo.

The owner put the stone in his lodge, near the fire, and prayed over it. This story reveals not only the use of such a rock, but also a common method of hunting buffalo before the Indians had horses.

There was once a very poor woman, the second wife of a Blackfoot. Her buffalo robe was old and full of holes; her buffalo moccasins were worn and ripped. She and her people were camped not far from a cliff that would be a good place for a buffalo drive. They were very much in need of buffalo, for they were not only ragged but starving.

One day while this poor woman was gathering wood, she heard a voice singing. Looking around, she found that the song was coming from a buffalo rock. It sang, “Take me. Take me. I have great power.”

So the woman took the buffalo rock. When she returned to her lodge, she said to her husband, “Call all the men and have them sing to bring the buffalo.”

“Are you in earnest?” her husband asked.

“Yes, I am,” the woman replied. “Call the men, and also get a small piece of the back of a buffalo from the Bear Medicine man. Ask some of the men to bring the four rattles they use.”

The husband did as his wife directed. Then she showed him how to arrange the inside of the lodge in a kind of square box with some sagebrush and buffalo chips. Though it was the custom for the first wife to sit next to her husband, the man directed his second wife to put on the dress of the other woman and to sit beside him. When everything was ready, the men who had been summoned sat down in the lodge beside the woman and her husband. Then the buffalo rock began to sing, “The buffalo will all drift back. The buffalo will all drift back.”

Hearing this song, the woman asked one of the young men to go outside and put a great many buffalo chips in line. “After you have them in place, wave at them with a buffalo robe four times, and shout at them in a singsong. At the fourth time, all the buffalo chips will turn into buffaloes and go over the cliff.”

The young man followed her directions, and the chips became buffaloes. At the same time, the woman led the people in the lodge in the singing of songs. One song was about the buffalo that would lead the others in the drive. While the people were chanting it, a cow took the lead and all the herd followed her. They plunged over the cliff and were killed.

Then the woman sang,

More than a hundred buffalo
Have fallen over the cliff.
I have made them fall.
And the man above the Earth hears me singing.
More than a hundred buffalo
Have fallen over the cliff.

And so the people learned that the rock was very powerful. Ever since that time, they have taken care of the buffalo rock and have prayed to it.

Source: firstpeople

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
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NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "Native American Rocks Legends: The Buffalo Rock – version 1" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/native-american-rocks-legends-the-buffalo-rock-version-1/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: September 19, 2014.

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@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2014,
    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
    month = Sep,
    day = 19,
    year = 2014,
    url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/native-american-rocks-legends-the-buffalo-rock-version-1/},
}
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The State of Mississippi's name derives from the Algonquin word "Misi-ziibi" meaning "Father of Waters."

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