Native American Pictographs

Published on May 7, 2013 by Casey

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Ojibwa (Chippewa) rock painting - Lake Superior
Ojibwa (Chippewa) rock painting – Lake Superior

Pictographs

What are Pictographs? Definition: Pictographs are rock paintings, that were often found in caves and on rock faces and created by ancient civilisations. Pictographs are ancient rock art figures and symbols that are drawn or painted onto a rock face, normally without any pecking or abrasive methods of creating the picture. Paint made from powdered minerals, blood, charcoal, or other substances were used to make pictographs. Pictography means the application of pigments.

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Origin of the word Pictographs

The word Pictograph comes from the Latin word ‘pictus’ meaning painted and the French word ‘graphie’ meaning to carve, “a writing, recording, or description” and was first used in reference to Native American art in 1851.

Purpose of Pictographs

The purpose of Pictographs was to express artistic or religious meanings, acknowledge special events or were created as a form of magic or to illustrate mysterious Mythical creatures and monsters.

Materials used for Pictographs

Various materials are used in the art of creating pictographs. A suitable surface was first located to create the pictographs. The materials used consisted of different colored paints and tools or utensils to apply the paint. The tools for creating pictographs included the following:

    Stone Tools to smooth the rock surface
    Bone and stone tools to crush the pigments
    Receptacles to mix and contain the paints and pigments
    Brushes to apply the paint made of materials
    Brushes were made of animal hair, plant fibers such as the yucca and hollow bird bones filled with pigment

Source: warpaths2peacepipes

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
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Native American Pictographs NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved October 22, 2014, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/native-american-pictographs/

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NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "Native American Pictographs" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/native-american-pictographs/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: October 22, 2014.

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@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2014,
    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
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    day = 22,
    year = 2014,
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}
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