Native American Activism in Chicago 1893-1934

Published on April 22, 2015 by Amy

Love this article and want to save it to read again later? Add it to your favourites! To find all your favourite posts, check out My Favourites on the menu bar.


Native American Activism in Chicago

In City Indian, Rosalyn R. LaPier and David R. M. Beck tell the engaging story of American Indian men and women who migrated to Chicago from across America. From the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition to the 1934 Century of Progress Fair, American Indians in Chicago voiced their opinions about political, social, educational, and racial issues.

dna testing, dna ancestry testing, ancestry, genealogy, indian genealogy records, paternity testing, turquoise jewelry, native american jewelry

City Indian focuses on the privileged members of the American Indian community in Chicago who were doctors, nurses, business owners, teachers, and entertainers. During the Progressive Era, more than at any other time in the city’s history, they could be found in the company of politicians and society leaders, at Chicago’s major cultural venues and events, and in the press, speaking out. When Mayor “Big Bill” Thompson declared that Chicago public schools teach “America First,” American Indian leaders publicly challenged him to include the true story of “First Americans.” As they struggled to reshape nostalgic perceptions of American Indians, these men and women developed new associations and organizations to help each other and to ultimately create a new place to call home in a modern American city.

Source: amazon

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
Based on the collective work of NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, © 2015 Native American Encyclopedia.
Cite This Source | Link To Native American Activism in Chicago 1893-1934
Add these citations to your bibliography. Select the text below and then copy and paste it into your document.

American Psychological Association (APA):

Native American Activism in Chicago 1893-1934 NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved April 25, 2015, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/native-american-activism-chicago-1893-1934/

Chicago Manual Style (CMS):

Native American Activism in Chicago 1893-1934 NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com. NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/native-american-activism-chicago-1893-1934/ (accessed: April 25, 2015).

Modern Language Association (MLA):

"Native American Activism in Chicago 1893-1934" NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia 25 Apr. 2015. <NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/native-american-activism-chicago-1893-1934/>.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE):

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "Native American Activism in Chicago 1893-1934" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/native-american-activism-chicago-1893-1934/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: April 25, 2015.

BibTeX Bibliography Style (BibTeX)

@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2015,
    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
    month = Apr,
    day = 25,
    year = 2015,
    url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/native-american-activism-chicago-1893-1934/},
}
You might also like:

Tags:  , , , ,

Facebook Comments

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Latest Articles
Art
Sponsor
Did You Know?

Native Americans shared their cure for scurvy with Europeans. It comprised of bark and needles of the hemlock or pine tree and were boiled to make a vitamin C tonic.

In the Spotlight
Most Favourited Posts
Photo Galleries
Native American Tribe Ogalala IINative American Politicians INative American Tribe SalishanNative American Quotes XII