Nambé Oweenge Pueblo, New Mexico

Published on July 18, 2012 by Amy

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The Kiva at Nambe Pueblo
The Kiva at Nambe Pueblo

Nambé Oweenge Pueblo is a pueblo in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, United States. Located about 15 miles north of Santa Fe at the base of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The Pueblo of Nambé has existed since the 14th century and was a primary cultural, economic, and religious center at the time of the arrival of Spanish colonists in the very early 17th century. Nambé was one of the Pueblos that organized and participated in the Pueblo Revolt of 1680. The 2000 United States Census estimates the Nambé population at 558.

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Synonymy

Nambé is the Spanish version of a similar-sounding Tewa word, which can be interpreted loosely as meaning “rounded earth.” The word “pueblo” stems from the Spanish word for “village.” Pueblo refers to the Southwestern style architecture and the people themselves.

Population

The 2000 United States Census surveyed the Nambé population at 558. The entire population living at Nambé Pueblo, according to the 2010 United States Census, is 1,611.

Language

The Nambé’s language is a dialect of the Tewa language.

History

Origin and early history
It is believed that all Pueblo people are descended from the Anasazi, possibly the Mogollon, and other ancient peoples. As the Anasazi abandoned their canyon homeland due to social upheaval and climate change, migrations took place and eventually the Nambé found their new homeland in New Mexico.

European contact
Juan de Oñate arrived in the area in 1598. He forced Nambé Pueblo, like other Pueblos, to start paying taxes with cotton, crops and labor. Catholic missionaries also came into the area, threatening Native religious beliefs. Pueblos would be renamed with saints names, and Nambé would have its first church built in the early 1600s. The Spanish also introduced new foods to the Native communities, including peaches, peppers and wheat. In 1620 a royal decree assigned civil offices to each Pueblo.

Source: wikipedia

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}
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