Marie Laws ~ Tlingit

Published on January 28, 2014 by Amy

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By Marie Laws
By Marie Laws

Marie Laws is Tlingit, Raven from the T’akdeintaan clan. Her Tlingit name is L’Daanaat. Marie has had formal art training in painting, sculpture, clay, stone, weaving and wood carving. She has demonstrated and interpreted Northwest Coast art forms at the Southeast Alaska Indian Cultural Center where she was involved in the design and weaving of two ceremonial robes.

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Recently Marie was an instructor in the Alaska State Council on the Arts Master/Apprentice Program. Marie has attended symposiums and workshops in New Zealand and throughout the Pacific Northwest. Her works in weaving, carving and paper-making have been exhibited in New Zealand as wellas in many venues throughout the U.S. and Alaska.

“Art in many forms has been a lifelong pursuit of mine,” wrote Marie Laws. “Beginning as a child, I was inspired by my mother, who worked in many disciplines.

“I was part owner of a gallery in Anchorage — the Rogue’s Gallery in the 1960s. In those days, I painted in oil. Also in the 1960s I began sculpting in clay and stone. In the late 1970s, we moved to Sitka, where I returned to some of the art inspired by my culture, such as weaving, carving and bentwood boxes. Some interesting opportunities for travel have grown from my art involvement. My daughter Teri and granddaughter Erin and I were invited to lecture and demonstrate at the New York Museum of Natural History and Art, the Peabody Museum at Yale and Humboldt State University in Arcata, California.

“I went to the Peabody Essex Museum in Salem, Mass., as a consultant for the Heritage Center in Anchorage. And I was invited twice to take part in art symposiums in New Zealand, once in 1993 as a weaver with indigenous weavers from around the Pacific Rim, and then in 1995 as a carver.

Source: alaskanativeartists

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Did You Know?

Freeze dried food is a Native Invention. The Inca of Peru used to preserve potatoes using a freeze-dry process. They would put them on mountain terraces, and the solar radiation and extremely cold temperatures created a freeze-dried product that lasted indefinitely.

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