How It Is: The Native American Philosophy of V. F. Cordova

Published on June 20, 2013 by Carol

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How It Is: The Native American
Philosophy of V. F. Cordova

Book title: How It Is: The Native American Philosophy of V. F. Cordova

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Editor: Kathleen Dean Moore, Kurt Peters, Ted Jojola, Amber Lacy

Foreword: Linda Hogan

Book Description:
Viola Cordova was the first Native American woman to receive a PhD in philosophy. Even as she became an expert on canonical works of traditional Western philosophy, she devoted herself to defining a Native American philosophy. Although she died prematurely of a brain aneurysm before she could complete her life’s work, some of her colleagues have organized her pioneering contributions into this provocative book.In three parts, Cordova sets out a complete Native American philosophy. First she explains her own understanding of the nature of reality itself—the origins of the world, the relation of matter and spirit, the nature of time, and the roles of culture and language in understanding all of these. She then turns to our role as residents of the Earth, arguing that we become human as we deepen our relation to our people and to our places, and as we understand the responsibilities that grow from those relationships. In the final section, she calls for a new reverence in a world where there is no distinction between the sacred and the mundane.Cordova clearly contrasts Native American beliefs with the traditions of the Enlightenment and Christianized Europeans (what she calls “Euroman” philosophy). By doing so, she leads her readers into a deeper understanding of both traditions and encourages us to question any view that claims a singular truth. From these essays—which are lucid, insightful, frequently funny, and occasionally angry—we receive a powerful new vision of how we can live with respect, reciprocity, and joy.

Source: Native-languages

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
Based on the collective work of NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, © 2014 Native American Encyclopedia.
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American Psychological Association (APA):

How It Is: The Native American Philosophy of V. F. Cordova NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved October 26, 2014, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-the-native-american-philosophy-cordova/

Chicago Manual Style (CMS):

How It Is: The Native American Philosophy of V. F. Cordova NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com. NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-the-native-american-philosophy-cordova/ (accessed: October 26, 2014).

Modern Language Association (MLA):

"How It Is: The Native American Philosophy of V. F. Cordova" NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia 26 Oct. 2014. <NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-the-native-american-philosophy-cordova/>.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE):

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "How It Is: The Native American Philosophy of V. F. Cordova" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-the-native-american-philosophy-cordova/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: October 26, 2014.

BibTeX Bibliography Style (BibTeX)

@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2014,
    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
    month = Oct,
    day = 26,
    year = 2014,
    url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-the-native-american-philosophy-cordova/},
}
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Did You Know?

Clarence Birdseye is attributed with bringing quick frozen foods to the masses. He got the idea during his fur trapping expeditions to Labrador in 1912 and 1916, where he saw the Native Americans and Aboriginals use freezing to preserve foods.

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