How the Bluebird got its color

Published on May 16, 2013 by Amy

Love this article and want to save it to read again later? Add it to your favourites! To find all your favourite posts, check out My Favourites on the menu bar.

The Bluebird
The Bluebird

A long time ago, the bluebird was a very ugly color. But Bluebird knew of a lake where no river flowed in or out, and he bathed in this four times every morning for four mornings.

dna testing, dna ancestry testing, ancestry, genealogy, indian genealogy records, paternity testing, turquoise jewelry, native american jewelry

Every morning he sang a magic song:

“There’s a blue water. It lies there. I went in. I am all blue.”

On the fourth morning Bluebird shed all his feathers and came out of the lake just in his skin. But the next morning when he came out of the lake he was covered with blue feathers.

Now all this while Coyote had been watching Bluebird. He wanted to jump in and get him to eat, but he was afraid of the water. But on that last morning Coyote said, “How is it you have lost all your ugly color, and now you are blue and gay and beautiful? You are more beautiful than anything that flies in the air. I want to be blue, too.”

Now Coyote at that time was a bright green.

“I only went in four times on four mornings,” said Bluebird. He taught Coyote the magic song, and he went in four times, and the fifth time he came out as blue as the little bird.

Then Coyote was very, very proud because he was a blue coyote. He was so proud that as he walked along he looked around on every side to see if anybody was looking at him now that he was a blue coyote and so beautiful.

He looked to see if his shadow was blue, too. But Coyote was so busy watching to see if others were noticing him that he did not watch the trail. By and by he ran into a stump so hard that it threw him down in the dirt and he was covered with dust all over. You may know this is true because even today coyotes are the color of dirt.

Source: firstpeople

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
Based on the collective work of NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, © 2014 Native American Encyclopedia.
Cite This Source | Link To How the Bluebird got its color
Add these citations to your bibliography. Select the text below and then copy and paste it into your document.

American Psychological Association (APA):

How the Bluebird got its color NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved September 20, 2014, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-the-bluebird-got-its-color/

Chicago Manual Style (CMS):

How the Bluebird got its color NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com. NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-the-bluebird-got-its-color/ (accessed: September 20, 2014).

Modern Language Association (MLA):

"How the Bluebird got its color" NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia 20 Sep. 2014. <NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-the-bluebird-got-its-color/>.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE):

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "How the Bluebird got its color" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-the-bluebird-got-its-color/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: September 20, 2014.

BibTeX Bibliography Style (BibTeX)

@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2014,
    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
    month = Sep,
    day = 20,
    year = 2014,
    url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-the-bluebird-got-its-color/},
}
You might also like:

Tags:  , , , ,

Facebook Comments

You must be logged in to post a comment.