How Rabbit Lost His Tail: A Traditional Cherokee Legend (Grandmother Stories)

Published on November 26, 2012 by Carol

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How Rabbit Lost His Tail
How Rabbit Lost His Tail:
A Traditional Cherokee Legend

Author: Deborah L. Duvall

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Illustrator: Murv Jacob

Book description:
Rabbit, whose Cherokee name is Ji-Stu, is known far and wide for his splendid tail. Long and bushy, and covered with thick, silky fur, he likes to show his tail off at the dances. All the girl animals want to dance with Ji-Stu because of his beautiful tail. But one night Otter comes to the dance, and both Ji-Stu and his tail are quickly forgotten when the girls see Otter’s magnificent coat.

Impressed by Otter, all the animals plan a council to decide who, of all the animals in the forest, owns the most beautiful coat. Now Ji-Stu must find a way to trick Otter out of his coat in time to win the contest, but in the process the trickster rabbit loses much more than he bargains for.

Deborah L. Duvall and Murv Jacob also collaborated on The Great Ball Game of the Birds and Animals and How Medicine Came to the People (UNM Press). Duvall is the author of several books on Cherokee history and legend. Jacob, a descendant of Kentucky Cherokees, is an internationally known artist and pipemaker who has also worked on over 70 book and video projects. Jacob won the 2003 Oklahoma Book Award in the Design and Illustration category for his drawings in The Great Ball Game of the Birds and Animals.

Source: Amazon

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How Rabbit Lost His Tail: A Traditional Cherokee Legend (Grandmother Stories) NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved September 30, 2014, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-rabbit-lost-his-tail-traditional-cherokee-legend-grandmother-stories/

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NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "How Rabbit Lost His Tail: A Traditional Cherokee Legend (Grandmother Stories)" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-rabbit-lost-his-tail-traditional-cherokee-legend-grandmother-stories/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: September 30, 2014.

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@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2014,
    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
    month = Sep,
    day = 30,
    year = 2014,
    url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/how-rabbit-lost-his-tail-traditional-cherokee-legend-grandmother-stories/},
}
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