How to make a Medicine Wheel

Published on July 12, 2012 by Amy

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Medicine Wheel Power Animals
Medicine Wheel Power Animals

The most widely used version of the Medicine Wheel comes from the Lakota tradition. At its most basic, it consists of a large or special center stone to represent Wakan-Tanka, the Great Everything, and four smaller stones to represent the cardinal directions (N, S, E, W). Sometimes four even smaller stones representing the ordinal directions (NE, SE, SW, NW) are also used.

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The Medicine Wheel can be of any size. Outdoor Medicine Wheels can be made large enough for a group of people to sit within it. It can be made much smaller so that only you can sit within it. Or it can be made in a small travel-size which you sit outside of and that can be taken anywhere and set up anywhere. This small, portable Medicine Wheel is the one I will be talking about here.

First, you need to decide which stones you wish to work with. Very large outdoor Medicine Wheels usually are made of big rocks of whatever kind that can be found in the area.

Directional Tumbled Stones Medicine Wheel

For a small portable Medicine Wheel that we will be building, the most common stones used are tumbled gemstones or crystal points. I recommend using:

  • green aventurine (Center)
  • citrine (East)
  • black onyx (West)
  • red jasper (South)
  • howlite (North)

If you wish to use ordinal stones as well, I suggest using tumbled clear quartz stones for all four of the ordinal directions.

Another method is to use a set of stones representing the Elements. I suggest using:

  • citrine point (Ether/Center)
  • carnelian (Fire/East)
  • chrysocolla (Earth/West)
  • blue lace agate (Water/South)
  • moonstone (Air/North)
  • 4 clear quartz stones(ordinal directions)
  • Or, create your own combination from these Element Stones

Source: artnatam

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The State of Oklahoma is from the Choctaw Peoples Language meaning "Red People." It is the combination of two words "Okla" meaning people and Humma" meaning red.

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