R. C. Gorman ~ Navajo

Published on January 17, 2015 by Carol

Love this article and want to save it to read again later? Add it to your favourites! To find all your favourite posts, check out My Favourites on the menu bar.


Navajo Poppies by RC Gorman

Rudolph Carl Gorman (July 26, 1931 – November 3, 2005) was a Native American artist of the Navajo Nation. Referred to as “the Picasso of American Indian art” by the New York Times, his paintings are primarily of Native American women and characterized by fluid forms and vibrant colors, though he also worked in sculpture, ceramics, and stone lithography. He was also an avid lover of cuisine, authoring four cookbooks, (with accompanying drawings) called Nudes and Food.

dna testing, dna ancestry testing, ancestry, genealogy, indian genealogy records, paternity testing, turquoise jewelry, native american jewelry

Biography

Gorman was born in Chinle, Arizona. His mother was Adele Katherine Brown, and his father Carl Gorman was a noted Navajo painter and teacher, who later became a code talker during World War II.

Gorman grew up in a traditional Navajo hogan and began drawing at age 3. His grandmother helped raise him, recounting Navajo legends and enumerating his genealogy of artist ancestors. She kindled his desire to become an artist. While tending sheep in Canyon de Chelly with his aunts, he used to draw on the rocks, sand, and mud, and made sculptures with the clay, with his earliest subjects including Mickey Mouse and Shirley Temple.

He credited a teacher, Jenny Lind at Ganado Presbyterian Mission School, for his inspiration to become a full-time artist.After he left high school, he served in the Navy before entering college, where he majored in literature and minored in art at Northern Arizona University.

Notable achievements

In 1958, he received the first scholarship from the Navajo Tribal Council to study outside of the United States, and enrolled in the art program at Mexico City College. There he learned of and was influenced by the work Diego Rivera. He later studied art at San Francisco State University, where he also worked as a model.

Gorman moved from California to New Mexico, opening his Navajo Gallery in Taos in 1968. It was the first Native American-owned art gallery in Taos.

In 1973, he was the only living artist whose work was shown in the “Masterworks of the American Indian” show held at Metropolitan Museum in New York. One of his pieces was selected for the cover of the exhibit’s catalog.

Gorman’s work was explored in a series on American Indian artists for the Public Broadcasting System (PBS). Other artists in the series included Helen Hardin, Charles Loloma, Allan Houser, Joseph Lonewolf, and Fritz Scholder.

Recognition and collectors

In 1983, Stephen Park and Chuck Henningsen published R.C. Gorman: A Portrait.

Harvard University recognized him for “notable contributions to American art and Native American culture” in 1986, and Mayor Dianne Feinstein of San Francisco declared March 19 to be “Gorman Day”.

His famous friends and collectors of his work included Elizabeth Taylor, Danny DeVito, Arnold Schwarzenegger, Barry Goldwater, Gregory Peck, Erma Bombeck, Lee Marvin, Jackie Onassis and fellow artist Andy Warhol, who silk-screened a portrait of Gorman that hung in a hall of his home surrounded by photos of Gorman’s celebrity and other personal friends.

Late life

In 1998, he donated art for Tom Udall’s campaign for election to the U.S. House of Representatives, and in 2003, donated his personal library to Diné College in Tsaile, Arizona.

On September 18, 2005, Gorman fell at his home and was taken to Holy Cross Hospital in Taos. On September 26, he was transferred to University Hospital (in Albuquerque). He died at age 74 on November 3. New Mexico governor Bill Richardson ordered flags flown at half-staff in his honor.

Influences

Gorman learned about the work of the Mexican social realists: Diego Rivera, David Siqueiros, and Rufino Tamayo.[6] He became inspired by their colors and forms to change from abstraction to abstract realism. He used abstract forms and shapes to create his own unique, personal realistic style, recognizable to all who are acquainted with his work. While in Mexico, he also learned stone lithography from a master printer, Jose Sanchez. He used lithography throughout his life as a means of making original multiple images of his inspirations, often working by drawing directly on the stones from which the lithographs were printed.

Gorman collected many Taos artists including several oil paintings by Bill Rane, whom Gorman said was his favorite Taos painter.Rane died on September 2, 2005 and Gorman fell ill 16 days later. They both had long-time galleries on Ledoux Street in Taos. Following their deaths in the fall of 2005, people in Taos said that it had been a very sad fall on Taos’ Historic Gallery Row.

Awards and honors

  • Honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts, College of Ganado, Ganado, Arizona (1978)
  • R. C. Gorman Day, State of New Mexico (January 8, 1979)
  • Doctorate of Humane Letters, Eastern New Mexico University, Portales, New Mexico (1980)
  • R. C. Gorman Day, San Francisco, California (March 18, 1986)
  • Humanitarian Award in Fine Art, Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts (May 1986)
  • New Mexico’s Governor’s Award of Excellence (1989)
  • Honorary Doctorate of Humane Letters, Northern Arizona University, Flagstaff, Arizona (1995)
  • Alumnae of the Year Award, National Association of Colleges and Universities (November 1993)
  • Honorary United Nations 50-year Chairman for New Mexico (1995)
  • Camino Real Award, Hispanic Chamber of Commerce, Santa Fe, New Mexico (1995)
  • Los Amigos del Turismo Cultural Award, Santa Fe, New Mexico (1996)
  • After Gorman’s death, New Mexico governor Bill Richardson ordered flags flown at half-staff in his honor (2005)
  • A Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs Walk of Stars was dedicated to him in 2002.
  • Named a “Living Legend” by Ralph Oliver, 1990, per Biographical Directory of Native American Painters

    Source: wikipedia

  • NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
    Based on the collective work of NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, © 2015 Native American Encyclopedia.
    Cite This Source | Link To R. C. Gorman ~ Navajo
    Add these citations to your bibliography. Select the text below and then copy and paste it into your document.

    American Psychological Association (APA):

    R. C. Gorman ~ Navajo NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved April 01, 2015, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/gorman-navajo/

    Chicago Manual Style (CMS):

    R. C. Gorman ~ Navajo NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com. NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/gorman-navajo/ (accessed: April 01, 2015).

    Modern Language Association (MLA):

    "R. C. Gorman ~ Navajo" NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia 01 Apr. 2015. <NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/gorman-navajo/>.

    Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE):

    NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "R. C. Gorman ~ Navajo" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/gorman-navajo/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: April 01, 2015.

    BibTeX Bibliography Style (BibTeX)

    @ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2015,
        title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
        month = Apr,
        day = 01,
        year = 2015,
        url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/gorman-navajo/},
    }
    You might also like:

    Tags:  , , ,

    RC Gorman – Navajo

    Published on June 2, 2014 by Carol

    Love this article and want to save it to read again later? Add it to your favourites! To find all your favourite posts, check out My Favourites on the menu bar.


    RC Gorman-Seated woman

    R. C. Gorman Navajo Painter was born in Chinle, AZ, 26 July 1932

    dna testing, dna ancestry testing, ancestry, genealogy, indian genealogy records, paternity testing, turquoise jewelry, native american jewelry

    Native American Navajo painter, printmaker and sculptor. The style that he developed stemmed from his experiences in Mexico and reveals the influence of his teachers as well as that of the Mexican muralists. He maintained a studio and gallery for his own works and those of other Native American artists in Taos, NM.

    Gorman’s Artistic Style
    While Gorman has handled such subject-matter as interpretations of Navajo rugs and pottery designs, his most successful and best-received works have been his studies of Navajo women. He portrayed them as archetypes; as monumental, nurturing ‘earth mothers’.

    In his paintings, Gorman grouped women in conventional poses or portrayed them in domestic pursuits, ranging from stolid affirmations to revelations of inner beauty and grace.

    Using various media, Gorman sometimes painted in acrylics, or drew the same subject in pastels and pencil. He worked out personal technical processes and used these with great effectiveness.

    His style was well-suited to lithographs, which he has produced in great number. He has also produced sculptures.

    Gorman’s Main Subject: Women
    Gorman said he liked to capture the beauty of his people, especially the women. As he explained in his autobiography, “Navajos always had respect for strong, powerful women who would go out and chop wood, herd sheep, have babies in the field. My Indian woman isn’t glamorous but she is beautiful. She is earthy, nurturing, and it is a constant challenge to capture her infinite variety.

    “I deal with the common woman who smells of the fields and maize. She lives and breathes… . My women work and walk on the land. They need to be strong to survive. They have big hands, strong feet. They are soft and strong like my grandmother who gave me life.

    “My women are remote, withdrawn in their silence. They don’t look out, but glance inward in the Indian way. You know their faces, but not a thing about their thoughts. They do not reveal whether they are looking at us or not.

    “I like to think that my women represent a universal woman. They don’t have to be from the reservation. They could be from Scottsdale or Africa. They’re composites of many women I’ve known.”

    Gorman used live models when he drew Navajo women, but not all of his models were Navajo. He said that by throwing a blanket over a Japanese woman, he could end up with a Navajo model. In fact, one of his favorite models was a young Japanese woman.

    Source: nativeamerican-art

    NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
    Based on the collective work of NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, © 2015 Native American Encyclopedia.
    Cite This Source | Link To RC Gorman – Navajo
    Add these citations to your bibliography. Select the text below and then copy and paste it into your document.

    American Psychological Association (APA):

    RC Gorman – Navajo NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved April 01, 2015, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/gorman-navajo/

    Chicago Manual Style (CMS):

    RC Gorman – Navajo NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com. NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/gorman-navajo/ (accessed: April 01, 2015).

    Modern Language Association (MLA):

    "RC Gorman – Navajo" NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia 01 Apr. 2015. <NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/gorman-navajo/>.

    Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE):

    NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "RC Gorman – Navajo" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/gorman-navajo/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: April 01, 2015.

    BibTeX Bibliography Style (BibTeX)

    @ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2015,
        title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
        month = Apr,
        day = 01,
        year = 2015,
        url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/gorman-navajo/},
    }
    You might also like:

    Tags:  , , , , ,

    Facebook Comments

    You must be logged in to post a comment.