Battle of Punished Woman Fork, aka: Battle of Squaw’s Den Cave (1878

Published on March 10, 2013 by Carol

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Squaw’s Den Cave courtesy
Kansas Geological Survey.

The last Indian battle in Kansas occurred after Chief Dull Knife and Little Wolf of the Northern Cheyenne decided to lead their people from their reservation near Fort El Reno, Oklahoma back to their former home in the north. The Cheyenne included 92 warriors, 120 women and 141 children attempting to make their way back home. As they came through Kansas crossing the Arkansas River at the Cimarron Crossing, Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Lewis, commander at Fort Dodge, was dispatched to capture and return them.

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Hiding from the soldiers during the day, the Indians traveled by night and made their way to present-day Scott County, Kansas where they took refuge in the Valley of Punished Woman’s Fork in late September, 1878. For two days they rested, re-supplied their food and fortified their position in what is today known as Battle Canyon. On the afternoon of September 27th, Colonel Lewis and his troops caught up with them, advancing from the southwest. The women, children, and elderly hid in Squaw’s Den Cave while the warriors fought the advancing soldiers. Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Lewis was wounded in the thigh. That night, the Cheyenne escaped, crossing the Smoky Hill River and to the northwest.

The following day, Lewis was placed in a military ambulance and the soldiers made their way to Fort Wallace, Kansas about 40 miles to the northwest. Along the way, he died of his wounds, becoming the last Kansas military casualty of the Indian Wars.

After escaping from Battle Canyon the tribe continued what has become known as the Cheyenne Raid, making their way through Decater and Rawlins Counties and committing a number of depredations.

The Cheyenne then made their way to Nebraska, split up with part of the group following Chief Dull Knife and the other with Little Wolf. Dull Knife’s group was captured close to Fort Robinson, Nebraska while Little Wolf’s band remained in the sand hills of Nebraska for the winter and eventually making their way to Montana.

The battle site is located about one mile southeast of Lake Scott State Park. Owned by the Scott County Historical Society, a marker designates the battle site and a monument has been placed over Squaw’s Den Cave.

Source: Legendsofamerica

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
Based on the collective work of NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, © 2014 Native American Encyclopedia.
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American Psychological Association (APA):

Battle of Punished Woman Fork, aka: Battle of Squaw’s Den Cave (1878 NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved November 01, 2014, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/battle-punished-woman-fork-aka-battle-squaws-den-cave-1878/

Chicago Manual Style (CMS):

Battle of Punished Woman Fork, aka: Battle of Squaw’s Den Cave (1878 NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com. NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/battle-punished-woman-fork-aka-battle-squaws-den-cave-1878/ (accessed: November 01, 2014).

Modern Language Association (MLA):

"Battle of Punished Woman Fork, aka: Battle of Squaw’s Den Cave (1878" NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia 01 Nov. 2014. <NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/battle-punished-woman-fork-aka-battle-squaws-den-cave-1878/>.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE):

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "Battle of Punished Woman Fork, aka: Battle of Squaw’s Den Cave (1878" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/battle-punished-woman-fork-aka-battle-squaws-den-cave-1878/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: November 01, 2014.

BibTeX Bibliography Style (BibTeX)

@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2014,
    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
    month = Nov,
    day = 01,
    year = 2014,
    url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/battle-punished-woman-fork-aka-battle-squaws-den-cave-1878/},
}
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Battle of Punished Woman Fork, aka: Battle of Squaw’s Den Cave (1878)

Published on February 18, 2013 by Carol

Love this article and want to save it to read again later? Add it to your favourites! To find all your favourite posts, check out My Favourites on the menu bar.


Squaw’s Den Cave courtesy Kansas Geological Survey.

The last Indian battle in Kansas occurred after Chief Dull Knife and Little Wolf of the Northern Cheyenne decided to lead their people from their reservation near Fort El Reno, Oklahoma back to their former home in the north. The Cheyenne included 92 warriors, 120 women and 141 children attempting to make their way back home. As they came through Kansas crossing the Arkansas River at the Cimarron Crossing, Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Lewis, commander at Fort Dodge, was dispatched to capture and return them.

dna testing, dna ancestry testing, ancestry, genealogy, indian genealogy records, paternity testing, turquoise jewelry, native american jewelry

Hiding from the soldiers during the day, the Indians traveled by night and made their way to present-day Scott County, Kansas where they took refuge in the Valley of Punished Woman’s Fork in late September, 1878. For two days they rested, re-supplied their food and fortified their position in what is today known as Battle Canyon. On the afternoon of September 27th, Colonel Lewis and his troops caught up with them, advancing from the southwest. The women, children, and elderly hid in Squaw’s Den Cave while the warriors fought the advancing soldiers. Lieutenant-Colonel William H. Lewis was wounded in the thigh. That night, the Cheyenne escaped, crossing the Smoky Hill River and to the northwest.

The following day, Lewis was placed in a military ambulance and the soldiers made their way to Fort Wallace, Kansas about 40 miles to the northwest. Along the way, he died of his wounds, becoming the last Kansas military casualty of the Indian Wars.

After escaping from Battle Canyon the tribe continued what has become known as the Cheyenne Raid, making their way through Decater and Rawlins Counties and committing a number of depredations.

The Cheyenne then made their way to Nebraska, split up with part of the group following Chief Dull Knife and the other with Little Wolf. Dull Knife’s group was captured close to Fort Robinson, Nebraska while Little Wolf’s band remained in the sand hills of Nebraska for the winter and eventually making their way to Montana.

The battle site is located about one mile southeast of Lake Scott State Park. Owned by the Scott County Historical Society, a marker designates the battle site and a monument has been placed over Squaw’s Den Cave.

Source: Legendsofamerica

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
Based on the collective work of NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, © 2014 Native American Encyclopedia.
Cite This Source | Link To Battle of Punished Woman Fork, aka: Battle of Squaw’s Den Cave (1878)
Add these citations to your bibliography. Select the text below and then copy and paste it into your document.

American Psychological Association (APA):

Battle of Punished Woman Fork, aka: Battle of Squaw’s Den Cave (1878) NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved November 01, 2014, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/battle-punished-woman-fork-aka-battle-squaws-den-cave-1878/

Chicago Manual Style (CMS):

Battle of Punished Woman Fork, aka: Battle of Squaw’s Den Cave (1878) NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com. NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/battle-punished-woman-fork-aka-battle-squaws-den-cave-1878/ (accessed: November 01, 2014).

Modern Language Association (MLA):

"Battle of Punished Woman Fork, aka: Battle of Squaw’s Den Cave (1878)" NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia 01 Nov. 2014. <NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/battle-punished-woman-fork-aka-battle-squaws-den-cave-1878/>.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE):

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "Battle of Punished Woman Fork, aka: Battle of Squaw’s Den Cave (1878)" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/battle-punished-woman-fork-aka-battle-squaws-den-cave-1878/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: November 01, 2014.

BibTeX Bibliography Style (BibTeX)

@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2014,
    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
    month = Nov,
    day = 01,
    year = 2014,
    url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/battle-punished-woman-fork-aka-battle-squaws-den-cave-1878/},
}
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