Aguilar Family ~ Santo Domingo Pueblo

Published on November 12, 2010 by John

Love this article and want to save it to read again later? Add it to your favourites! To find all your favourite posts, check out My Favourites on the menu bar.


A sample of the Aguilar
family pottery

The Aguilar Family is a family of Native American potters from Santo Domingo Pueblo, New Mexico, United States, consisting of three sisters, Felipita Aguilar Garcia, Asuncion Aguilar Cate and Mrs. Ramos Aguilar.

dna testing, dna ancestry testing, ancestry, genealogy, indian genealogy records, paternity testing, turquoise jewelry, native american jewelry

In the early 1900s, pottery making at Santo Domingo Pueblo had experienced a significant decline. In 1910, Julius Seligman, who worked at the Bernalillo Mercantile Company near the pueblo, noticed the decline. At his suggestion, three sisters, Felipita Aguilar Garcia, Asuncion Aguilar Cate and Mrs. Ramos Aguilar, attempted to revive the dying art. The three women worked together making pottery and their work became known as “Aguilar pottery.”

The Aguilar sisters made traditional polychrome ollas, jars and dough bowls with several different styles of decoration. The painting style for which they are best known was black paint on a white slip or black and red on a white slip, which almost totally obscured the white background. This style was unique compared to the typical geometric forms of Santo Domingo pottery where areas were usually left open of unpainted. This style has become known as “negative boldface” or reverse-painted Aguilar pottery. They also made traditional Santo Domingo types including black-on-cream and black-on-red.

The Aguilar sisters’ style of pottery ended around 1915 but is today making a comeback as the Aguilar polychrome style has been revived by one of Santo Domingo’s leading potters, Robert Tenorio.

The Denver Art Museum in Denver, Colorado has the finest collection of Aguilar family pottery today. The School of American Research in Santa Fe, New Mexico also has several excellent examples of their work.

Source: Wikipedia

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged
Based on the collective work of NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, © 2014 Native American Encyclopedia.
Cite This Source | Link To Aguilar Family ~ Santo Domingo Pueblo
Add these citations to your bibliography. Select the text below and then copy and paste it into your document.

American Psychological Association (APA):

Aguilar Family ~ Santo Domingo Pueblo NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Retrieved October 23, 2014, from NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com website: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/aguilar-family/

Chicago Manual Style (CMS):

Aguilar Family ~ Santo Domingo Pueblo NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com. NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/aguilar-family/ (accessed: October 23, 2014).

Modern Language Association (MLA):

"Aguilar Family ~ Santo Domingo Pueblo" NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Native American Encyclopedia 23 Oct. 2014. <NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/aguilar-family/>.

Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE):

NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com, "Aguilar Family ~ Santo Domingo Pueblo" in NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged. Source location: Native American Encyclopedia http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/aguilar-family/. Available: http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com. Accessed: October 23, 2014.

BibTeX Bibliography Style (BibTeX)

@ article {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com2014,
    title = {NativeAmericanEncyclopedia.com Unabridged},
    month = Oct,
    day = 23,
    year = 2014,
    url = {http://nativeamericanencyclopedia.com/aguilar-family/},
}
You might also like:

Tags:  , , , , , , , , , , ,

Facebook Comments

You must be logged in to post a comment.

Did You Know?

Freeze dried food is a Native Invention. The Inca of Peru used to preserve potatoes using a freeze-dry process. They would put them on mountain terraces, and the solar radiation and extremely cold temperatures created a freeze-dried product that lasted indefinitely.

Sponsor
In the Spotlight
Latest Articles
Most Favourited Posts
Photo Galleries
Native American Tribe ClayoquotNative American Tribe KarokNative American Tribe DiomedeNative American Tribe Cheyenne